creativity

Weisberg, Robert W. (1994). “Genius and Madness?: A Quasi-Experimental Test of the Hypothesis That Manic-Depression Increases Creativity”. Psychological Science. 5 (6): 361–367. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.1994.tb00286.x. ISSN 0956-7976. Creativity is a phenomenon whereby something new and somehow valuable is formed. The created item may be intangible (such as an idea, a scientific theory, a musical composition, or a joke) or a physical object (such as an invention, a printed literary work, or a painting). Scholarly interest in creativity is found in a number of disciplines, primarily psychology, business studies, and cognitive science, but also education, technology, engineering, philosophy (particularly philosophy of science), theology, sociology, linguistics, economics, and mathematics, covering the relations between creativity and general intelligence, personality type, mental and neural processes, mental health, or artificial intelligence; the potential for fostering creativity through education and training; the fostering of creativity for national economic benefit, and the application of creative resources to improve the effectiveness of teaching and learning.

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